Does Rain Sound Louder When It Falls On A Metal Roof?

Does Rain Sound Louder When It Falls On A Metal Roof?

We all know how quickly myths and misconceptions can spread, even if there isn’t a shred of evidence to back them up. This is especially true in the era of social media and instant internet access we find ourselves living in, where it is easier than ever before for a piece of misinformation to spread like wildfire.

Case in point, you’ve probably, on more than one occasion, heard the “fact” that people swallow up to 8 spiders a year while sleeping. Some of you probably still believe this is true. But it’s not. It was actually made up and put online to illustrate how easily misinformation can spread on the internet.

But it isn’t just spiders that have misinformation spread about them on the internet. Google any topic and you’re likely to find contrasting information from numerous sources.

When it comes to the wonderful world of metal roofing, there are more than enough myths and misconceptions to go around. This may be because metal roofing on residential properties is still less common than traditional asphalt and shingle roofing materials.

Some popular myths about metal roofing have a kernel of truth to them that has been taken out of context. For example, many people say that metal roofing is much more expensive than traditional roofing materials are.

The kernel of truth to this myth is that yes, metal roofing often has higher upfront installation costs. The full truth, however, is that the increased durability, greater lifespan and higher rate of energy efficiency make metal roofing a much more cost effective option in the long run.

One of the biggest myths about metal roofing is that it makes the rainfall sound much louder than it actually is.

To understand where this misconception came from, you need to look into the history and traditional uses of metal roofing. In the past, metal roofing was used traditionally for agricultural and industrial applications, such as warehouses, sheds and barns. Obviously, these buildings weren’t made with residential use in mind. This means that the metal roofing was often installed over the open frames of the buildings, leading to rainfall sounding louder.

Today, when metal roofing is installed on residential or commercial properties, it is installed over a solid wood roof deck, and sometimes also additional insulation. This means that the sound of rainfall on the metal roof is reduced, making it no louder than rainfall on asphalt shingle roofing.

In fact, a study looking into noise sources and their effects from the Purdue University found that rain falling on a metal roof registers at an average 52 decibels – that is just 2 decibels louder than quiet conversation at home and no higher or lower than that of rain falling on traditional roofing.

If you are interested in having a metal roof installed in the Scranton area, be sure to visit Garvin Construction today!